Sunday, October 13, 2013

Running with the Bada$$es...S & S..A Jedi's report

I haven't done a race report in awhile and this one was written three days after Hali. I then put it aside.  Since then I have looked into my contact lens issue and have many things to try.  My 100's all seem to follow the same format. I sign up for 100 miler from the comfort of my couch while drinking beer. I show up and run a pretty good feeling 50k, I do something dumb ass like getting hurt from falling or zoning out and getting lost, I stumble through the night with the help of my princess or Scout. I finally realize I am behind and get serious. That pretty much seems to be the short version of all my 100's.

I originally was going to do 2 100's this year, then plan tourism by 100 trip next year. But after DNFing at MMT due to issues, I found myself pissed off. It's not that I was upset that I didn't make it, it was that I didn't go down swinging. So I decided to ramp up the pain. Instead of two 100's this year I was going to complete 4 and I was at zero. So I completed a very muddy Tarc 100, followed by a hot and muddy VT 100 which brings me to the Haliburton 100. Alway up to running different trails in different areas this one was going to be extra special because it was Scout and Squirrels first 100. As you probably know by now these badass trail runners didn't disappoint. And to add to the festivities there was a very entertaining film crew plus super crew Rick (Bruce) and Pete( ? ). They helped me and made the run so much fun. As the short version stated my first third of the race was pretty painless, except for some wrong turns that added about a extra mile(dumb ass). But it soon was apparent there was no way to ignore the fact that I was still worn out from the VT roads. I tell myself it's time to toughen up. During this low point, I miss a turn and continue up a steep hill adding more extra distance, this might have been a good thing because I realized it was time to fight. For more detail on course refer to Scout and Squirrel's reports. At the half way turn around(it is a double out and back), my princess is waiting with a headlamp and a large coffee to be handed off. The next 6k is a private dirt road followed 6k single track that wraps around a lake that goes by uneventful. It's time for the princess to pace. Or as she tells me time to carry my sorry ass through the night then get the privilege to pick up the pieces and wait on your lazy ass for days. Ahh marriage. Off we go slowly on dead legs into the night. The next sections were fairly technical with some climbs, the course does have a 10,000 ft gain.  Not much remembered from these sections except one part after hearing much night activity we heard the loudest, most pain laden sound I have ever heard in the night. I was thinking something just got trapped until we came around a bend and we found a runner and his pacer refunding what we heard later was too many pills. I am still haunted buy these inhuman sounds. The last section is a long, mostly smooth uphill dirt road which should be a good part to make time if my legs weren't so worn. There is an aid station you go through before you go a little further to turnaround then back to aid station. This is where I say good bye to the princess, have a cup of great soup and off on last twenty five miles. It had been cloudy with occasional rain since the start, now it was clear and very cold. All I had on was a short sleeve shirt. But here comes the 100 mile bitch slap I never saw coming. Having just worn two week contacts at VT with no problems, I figured it was the way to go at Hali. But along with the cold night, my contacts became like I would imagine having a bad case of cataracts. I could hardly see through the fog of the lenses. As much as I tried my cold, swollen fingers would not allow me to remove them. After losing about twenty minutes trying I decided it was time go into forget (word edit here) it mode. Did I mention this was my first hundred in Hoka's. The high profile of the Hokas, tired legs and very impaired vision caused me to do dozens of trail push ups over the 15 miles. It was slow, but at least the ground punches kept me awake. I came into the next aid station to find the TM crew. They put a long sleeve shirt and a hat on me and were ready to help. I didn't tell them about my vision because in my burnt out mind I believed there was nothing they could do and did not want worry the princess. Plus all my dumb ass mistakes were adding up. So off I go kissing the ground regularly. I get aid station 4 to find ''the other Mindy'' there with three espresso gels and message from Ann that she was at the next aid station. She helped me find my drop bag where I stripped off all warm clothes, vest and water bottles. Mindy was looking at me like I was crazy. But I had 16 K  to go with three aid station and it was time get my bitch ass to the finish. During the next section the day started to warm and my contacts started clear. The force is good. I was running not just shuffling in between walks. I pass some runners who are giving it all they have to move forward and am proud to be among them. They are me and I am them. Back of the pack is where I belong. I pass Ann, grab a gulp of water and finish the last 2K. I come in to find Ann, S&S, Bruce, Pete, Matt and Ben cheering. It was perfect. Haliburton was a homey, well put on 100. The course was well marked ( I own all course mistakes). The aid stations and volunteers were top notch The pre and post food with a local beer, bagels and coffee morning of were great. They were proud of their race and it showed. I would run it again. I seem to have a love hate thing with the Hokas, this was my first 100 in them. They definitely caused me to face plant more in second fifty, but I came out with very little foot swelling and no blisters. This was a first. I seem to go though periods were I question why I am doing 100s, it's not to impress you all with my back of pack finishes. I remember an old quote from Mick Jagger that goes, ''anything worth doing is worth over doing.'' W.T.F. That's this years only race report. Bye.                                

Oh ya one last thing.     Scout and Squirrel are  awesome!

3 comments:

Sparkplug said...

George, you DO impress us! If I could be half as tough as you, I'd be set :) wishing you an awesome final 100 at Ghost Train in a few months! Then I hope you take a bit of time to rest :) Alrhough, I'm not sure resting is really your style! ;)

100th Mile said...

Great report George. You're an inspiration to all of us. Seems like Ghost Train is an excellent race for the Hoka's, and I can't wait to hear how it goes!

Scout said...

<3 <3 <3

Sorry I was late to find this report. so many cool things. I am the walrus :D